Illinois State University Mathematics Department

MAT 312: Probability and Statistics for Middle School Teachers

Spring 1999
9:35 - 10:50 am TR STV 350A
Dr. Roger Day (day@math.ilstu.edu)



Sample Quiz #4
look at solution notes


1. TRUE or FALSE: Experimental probability considers all possible things that could happen in an experiment.

a) TRUE

b) FALSE

2. TRUE or FALSE: An experiment consists of flipping a coin and recording the result. The sample space for the experiment is the set {heads, tails}.

a) TRUE

b) FALSE

3. TRUE or FALSE: Two coins are flipped and the number of heads showing is recorded, so the sample space is {0,1,2}. Each outcome in the sample space is equally likely.

a) TRUE

b) FALSE

4. TRUE or FALSE: Two dice are rolled and the sum of the two face-up sides is recorded. Let event A represent that the sum is greater than 8. Then P(A) = 4/11.

a) TRUE

b) FALSE

5. TRUE or FALSE: Two dice are rolled and the sum of the two face-up sides is recorded. If event A represents that the sum is an even number and event B represents that the sum is an odd number, A and B are complementary events.

a) TRUE

b) FALSE

6. TRUE or FALSE: Two dice are rolled and the sum of the two face-up sides is recorded. If event A represents that the sum is an even number and event B represents that the sum is an odd number, A and B are mutually exclusive events.

a) TRUE

b) FALSE

7. If two events are mutually exclusive, then they are complementary.

a) SOMETIMES TRUE

b) ALWAYS TRUE

c) NEVER TRUE

8. An experiment consists of two tasks. First, a fair coin is tossed and the result is recorded. Next, a die is rolled and the value on the face-up side is recorded. If A represents the event "a head results" for the first task and B represents the event "an even number is recorded" for the second task, then A and B are independent events.

a) SOMETIMES TRUE

b) ALWAYS TRUE

c) NEVER TRUE

9. For any two events X and Y, P(X or Y) is greater than P(X and Y). Assume that X and Y do not represent the same event and that events X and Y are not impossible events.

a) SOMETIMES TRUE

b) ALWAYS TRUE

c) NEVER TRUE

10. For events R and T, to calculate P(R|T) we must know P(T).

a) SOMETIMES TRUE

b) ALWAYS TRUE

c) NEVER TRUE

11. A single letter is drawn from the set {g,e,o}. What is the probability that the letter drawn is a member of the set {g,e,o,m,t,r,y}?

12. An experiment consists of rolling a single fair die. Determine the probability that the result is:

a) greater than or equal to 5.

b) an odd number.

c) a number divisible by 2 or 3.

d) a number divisible by 2 and 3.

13. A coin is flipped three times and the number of heads is recorded.

a) List the sample space for this experiment.

b) Determine the probability of each unique outcome in the sample space.

14. An experiment has six mutually exclusive outcomes, call them A, B, C, D, E, and F. If the sample space for the experiment is a uniform sample space, what is P(A or D)?

15. Pat is about to take a 4-intem TRUE/FALSE quiz. Pat has no knowledge of the material and decides to flip a coin to answer each item. What is the probability that Pat earns a perfect score on the quiz?



Actual Quiz to be Administered Thursday 8 April 1999
.