Home Page of
 Tami S. Martin


Contact Information

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Office: Stevenson Hall 329C

Hours: By appointment

Phone: (309) 438-7864
Fax: (309) 438-5866

e-mail: tsmartin@ilstu.edu

Mailing Address:
4520 Mathematics Department
Illinois State University
Normal, IL 61790-4520


Courses Taught at ISU

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Mathematics Content Courses

MAT 145 - Calculus I

MAT 211 - Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometry

Elementary/Middle School Content

MAT 204 - Geometry for K-8 Teachers

MAT 207 - Functions & Technology for K-8 Teachers

MAT 314 - Concepts of Calculus for K-8 Teachers

Secondary School Methods and Student Teacher Supervision

MAT 223 - Introduction to Secondary Mathematics Education

MAT 323 - Mathematics Methods for the Secondary School

MAT 324 - Seminars for Student Teachers of Mathematics

C&I 399.27 - Supervision of Student Teachers

Teacher Improvement Program

MAT 429.31 - Improving Student Understanding of Geometry Proofs

MAT 429.31 - Enhancing Students' Geometric Reasoning through Investigations, Projects and Technology

Master's/Doctoral

MAT 401 - Current Research in School Mathematics

MAT 583 - Supervision of Professional Project

MAT 585 - Topics in Mathematics Education Seminar

MAT 587 - Issues and Trends in Secondary School Mathematics

MAT 599 - Supervision of Doctoral Dissertation


External Grants

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Proof Grant

"An Investigation of Pedagogical Factors Influencing Student Understanding of Geometric Proof." Co-Principal Investigator with Dr. Sharon Soucy McCrone and Fiscal Agent. The purpose of the three-year study is to develop an empirically grounded theoretical model that relates pedagogy to student understanding of geometric proofs. National Science Foundation. Award period: 4/01/00 ­ 5/31/04. Total amount of award: $409,372.


Publications

Journal Articles

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Martin, T. S., Cullen, C. J., & Day, R. (2011). What’s 2 got to do with it? Using dynamic geometry environments to find surprising results and motivate proof. New England Mathematics Journal (Focus Issue: Exploring the Richness of Geometry via Technology). (Invited submission), 43, 49-62.

 

Martin, T. S., & Speer, W. R. (2009). Mathematics teaching today. Teaching Children Mathematics, 15 (7), 400-403.

Martin, T. S., McCrone, S. M. S., Bower, M. L., & Dindyal, J. (2005). The interplay of teacher and student actions in the teaching and learning of geometric proof. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 60 (1), 95-124.

Martin, T. S., & Day, R. (2004). Book review: “Understanding Calculus, Second Edition. H. S. Bear, 2003. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.” Mathematics Teacher, 97 (5), p. 382.

McCrone, S. S., & Martin, T. S. (2004). Assessing high school students’ understanding of geometric proof. Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education, 4 (2), 223-242.

Martin, T. S., & McCrone, S. S. (2003). Classroom Factors Related to Geometric Proof Construction Ability. Mathematics Educator, 7 (1), 18-31.

Martin, T. S., Hunt, C. A., Lannin, J., Leonard, Jr., W., Marshall, G. L., & Wares, A. (2001). How reform secondary mathematics texts stack up against NCTM's principles & standards. Mathematics Teacher, 94 (7), 540-545, 589.

Martin, T. S., & Day, R. (2000). Performance-based assessment of secondary mathematics student teachers. Action in Teacher Education, 23 (3), 86-95.

Martin, T. (2000). Calculus students’ abilities to solve geometric related rate problems. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 12 (2), 74-91.

Martin, T. S. (2000). Book review: “African Fractals: Modern Computing and Indigenous Design. Ron Eglash. 1999. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.” Mathematics Teacher, 93 (2), 160-161.

Martin, T., & Johnson, A. (1995). Penrose tilings. New England Mathematics Journal, 27 (2), 23-46.

Martin, T.  (1991). Fracturing our ideas about dimension. In C. Findell (Ed.), NCTM Student Math Notes (pp.1-4). Supplement to NCTM News Bulletin, 28 (2).


Publications

Books & Book Chapters

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Martin, T. S., Lewis, G., Jain, D., & Day, R. (2010). Exploring the teacher’s role in a discourse-rich environment to promote proving in the secondary school. In Brosnan, P., Erchick, D. B., & Flevares, L. (Eds.). Proceedings of the 32 annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (pp. 829-836). Columbus, OH: The Ohio State University.

 

McCrone, S. M. S., & Martin, T. S. (2009). Formal proof in high school geometry: Student perceptions of structure, validity and purpose. In M. Blanton, D. Stylianou, & E. Knuth (Eds.) Teaching and learning mathematics proof across the grades: A K-16 perspective. New York: Routledge/Taylor & Francis.

Burke, M., Luebeck, J., Martin, T. S., McCrone. S., Piccolino, A., & Riley, K. (in production). Principles and standards for school mathematics Navigations series: Navigating through reasoning & proof in grades 9-12. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics. (2008). The PRIME leadership framework: Principles and indicators for mathematics education leaders. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree. (Writing team members: Don Balka, Laurie Boswell, John Carter, Linda Fulmore, Tim Kanold, Henry Kepner, Steve Leinwand, Miriam Leiva, Tami Martin, Ruth Miles, Suzanne Mitchell, Steve Viktora, and Gwen Zimmermann.)

Martin, T. S., & Barker, D. (2007). Factors influencing the use of representations in the classroom. In Lamberg, T. & Wiest, L. R. (Eds.). (2007). Proceedings of the 29th annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (pp. 346-349). Stateline (Lake Tahoe), NV: University of Nevada, Reno.

Martin, T. S. (Ed.) (2007). Mathematics teaching today: Improving practice, improving student learning, (2nd ed.) (A revision of the Professional Standards for Teaching Mathematics). Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

McCrone, S. M. S., & Martin, T. S. (2006). Going beyond the rules: Making sense of proof. In S. Alatorre, J. L. Cortina, M. Sáiz, & A. Méndez (Eds.) Proceedings of the 28th Annual Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 2, pp. 235-236). Mérida, Mexico: Universidad Pedagógica Nacional.

McCrone, S. S., & Martin, T. S. (2004). The impact of teacher actions on student proof schemes in geometry. In D. McDougall (Ed.), Proceedings of the 26th annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 2, pp. 593-602). Columbus, OH: ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

Martin, T. S., & McCrone, S. S. (2003). The teaching and learning of geometric proof: An emerging theory. In N. A. Pateman, B. J. Dougherty, & J. T. Zilliox (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2003 joint meeting of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education and the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 1, p. 244). Honolulu, HI: Center for Research and Development Group.

Dossey, J. A., Jones, C. O., & Martin, T. S. (2002). Analyzing student responses in mathematics using two-digit rubrics. In D. F. Robitaille & A. E, Beaton (Eds.) Secondary Analysis of the TIMSS Results. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

McCrone, S. S., Martin, T. S., Dindyal, J., & Wallace, M. L. (2002). An investigation of classroom factors that influence proof construction ability. In D. Mewborn (Ed.), Proceedings of the 24th annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 4, pp. 1701-1712). Columbus, OH: ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

Martin, T. S., & McCrone, S. S. (2001). Investigating the teaching and learning of proof: First year results. In R. Speiser (Ed.), Proceedings of the 23rd annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 2, pp. 585-594). Columbus, OH: ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

McCrone, S. S., & Martin, T. S. (2000). Tools for investigating high school students’ understanding of geometric proof. In M. Fernandez (Ed.), Proceedings of the 22nd annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 1, pp. 295-299). Columbus, OH: ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

Martin, T. S., & Day, R. (2000). Performance-based assessment of secondary mathematics student teachers. In M. Fernandez (Ed.), Proceedings of the 22nd annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 2, pp. 579-584). Columbus, OH: ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

Martin, T. (1996). First-year calculus students' procedural and conceptual understandings of geometric related rate problems. In E. Jakubowski, D. Watkins, and H. Biske (Eds.), Proceedings of the 18th annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 1, pp. 47-52). Columbus, OH: ERIC Clearinghouse for Science, Mathematics, and Environmental Education.

Martin, T. (1994). Investigation 7: What in the world are fractals? In F. R. Curcio and N. S. Bezuk (Eds.), Curriculum and evaluation standards for school mathematics addenda series, Grades 5-8: Understanding rational numbers and proportions  (pp. 76-89). Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Greenes, C., Chapin, S., Findell, C., Spungin, R., Johnson, A., & Martin, T. (1991 and 1992). Project FOCUS. Seven modules designed for mathematics remediation at the college level. Boston: Boston University.


Last updated December 1, 2012

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NCTM Fall 2012 - A minute to win it: Motivating mathematics connection (Martin & Day)

What Our Students Really Know About Proof and Reasoning in Geometry: A Look at Classroom-based Research Data

(NCTM 2000 Handout)